CaseyDiskin

Casey Diskin’s interview

Casey Diskin‘s Interview about new Center

Christy Lee With me now is Casey Diskin . She is the Director at ORC. How are you Casey?

Casey Diskin, Director of ORC I’m well, how are you today?

Christy Lee Good. Talk to us a little bit about you’re helping kids and families. And right now, we’re in crisis and you must be in crisis mode. Tell us a little bit about what does some of the families that are talking to you about right now.

Casey Diskin, Director of ORC: Absolutely. So as you said, we are definitely in crisis mode and what’s a little bit unique is that it is impacting pretty much everyone. So even if you’re not immediately impacted yourself or your family by the Covid-19, the environment around you is still impacting your body. Right. You’re seeing it on TV. So we’re we’re hearing a lot of families who are experiencing some fear, of course, because some families are losing individuals. They are experiencing some sadness, some grief, some of the typical things that we would see when you lose a loved one. So we’re just really trying to work with them outside of their traditional or the clinical needs that brought them to us in the first place. But this new this new stuff that’s impacting pretty much everyone.

Christy Lee So we’re talking about the grief of the loss of maybe a loved one. The grief of changing everyday routine. And then you add on to the economic impact that many of us are feeling across the area. Have you ever seen something that’s compounded so many things into one situation that our families and our kids have to deal with?

Casey Diskin, Director of ORC Absolutely not, at least not at such a global space that we’re in right now. So, you know, the families who we work with are ready, challenged with a lot of the things that we’re talking about, especially when it comes to getting their basic needs and economic needs met. So we have this compounded now where even families who were maybe needing a little bit of us are now left with needing more and we’re challenged with being able to try to get them those needs because of that required and necessary social distancing and needing to stay home, to stay safe. You know, we’re just limited in being able to get them the things that they want on our campus. We have what we call the boutique where they work typically be able to get a lot of those things, and that’s unavailable to them right now. There’s transportation barriers, even though there are plenty of places that here giving away food for families who need it, they still have the challenge of getting there. So it’s it’s never been this global and impacting just about everyone who we’re working with.

Christy McDonald You know what I think about families and kids, you know, I know even from my own family, I feel that we’re going to be forever changed by this. And we’ve we’ve done a lot of conversations at One Detroit about children and trauma and the trauma they experience in everyday life and how that impacts who they who they are shaped to be down the line. Talk to me a little bit about those concerns of the impact of trauma on kids and moving through an event like this that we really don’t see an end to.

Casey Diskin Director of ORC Absolutely. So it will it’s exactly the same things that you would see on an individual basis on someone experiencing trauma that’s more personal and unique to their family. So I will say that it could potentially be something that we can utilize to maximize our work with families, because it is something that more people will be able to relate to. So there won’t be this secret that you can’t talk about or that people will judge you about because we’re all experiencing it. So I think it will be important for us to remember how that can lend support in and of itself to everyone. Outside of that, you can’t expect that, especially children who may not understand a little bit of what’s going on or expecting that, you know, well, when this goes away, then things will be back to normal. But outside of the experiences and the economics, like you talked about, their personal lives could potentially be changed forever, too. We don’t know what jobs are going to look like if the parents will be able to go back to those jobs that they had. So, you absolutely need to look out for those traditional signs of significant changes in your child. So, of course, you know, you can expect at this point, at this point to see some sadness, see some worry, have some confusion about what’s going on and want to make sure you limit the exposure that your child has to this information online, on the television, in your own personal conversations or family. You want to make sure that you’re not continuing to expose them to what could be traumatic and cause more confusion on an ongoing basis, but you do want to balance that with talking about it. You don’t want to push them. You don’t want to act like it’s not existing. You do want to be very realistic because you don’t know if it may come and hit closer to home. And it’s going to be something that you have to deal with at that point.

Christy McDonald Are there any better coping tools that that we can kind of give our kids right now besides either encouraging them to talk about it, not exposing them to too much information? Or is there a way to kind of help them move through it or get them and get them away from it for a little bit?

Casey Diskin, Director at ORC Absolutely. So one of the things that we are really encouraging families to do, which gonna be a little bit a little bit difficult because, you know, we’re all sort of in a home environment, at least in sort of a relaxed mood. So we want to just be there. So we are really encouraging families to create and stick to a routine or schedule on a day to day basis so that the children, the other parents sort of know what to expect. We want them to have some alone time and be able to explore like children do, whether that’s being able to talk on the telephone with their children, have sibling time, you know, without the parents. We don’t want them to have to always be sort of good and sitting and being still, because that’s just really unnatural for a child.

Christy McDonald For anybody.

Casey Diskin– Exactly. We also want to encourage activities for the family. This is a great opportunity to bond. And that’s a lot of what I’ve been hearing, at least in my personal life as well, is that this is giving people an opportunity because they have time on their hands to make those phone calls. People are getting creative. And people who typically watch sort of shy away from technology are using the video platforms a little bit more. So really, you know, creating as much of a supportive and structure routine in your home as possible. Again, limiting the exposure but allowing time to talk about it. You could even be as creative as saying, okay, we’re just gonna have one daily update about what’s going on or we’re gonna talk about it two times a week. But you want them to know that they can come to you with questions, be supportive, be caring. You know, don’t sort of assume there’s nothing for you to worry about or assume that a child isn’t worried about Covid. Make sure that they know that it’s okay and it’s an open space for them to be able to ask those questions and understand a little bit more.

Christy McDonald Do you think that this pandemic will change the way we look at counseling services, at mental health about any kind of resource to help us mentally process things in the future? Because sometimes people don’t want to talk about it, but it would seem to be that now, more than ever, we need to take into consideration where we are mentally to be able to deal with whatever is going to happen down the road.

Casey Diskin Absolutely. I think that that really borders on where we were are ready and the mental health field and helping people better understand what trauma looks like and how it impacts people and how that impact looks on a day to day basis. So, again, this is still a traumatic experience. You can expect to have the same sort of…sometimes we call it toxic fallout, meaning some of the negative impacts that trauma have on your life, your relationships, your mood, your mental health. You can expect that. I think, again, that we can use this this global effect to be supportive to one another. I do expect that more people probably will be open to getting mental health services because, again, this is not some secret thing that just happens that they are family. So knowing that more people experience that and most people are struggling with and I need some support, I do think that we will probably see more people willing to enter into mental health services, at least specifics of this and utilize some of those support services.

Casey Diskin And you’re able right now to connect with your clients through technology. This is it’s really changed the way we are interacting with everyone.

Casey Diskin – Absolutely. We previously and traditionally, especially in the public sector. So in the community mental health space, therapy was only face to face in an office or in a group setting in a room. And, you know, we’ve seen some private sectors where they have already ventured out a little bit more. So texting and video and telephone calls. But this is very new for us. We literally had to shift the way we did business every day within four days to be able to still meet with our families. Some of them were not ready for this. Some of them opted out and said, nope, you know, we’ll just give it a chance and we’ll come back you know, when the campus is open. But what we did find is that once it became prolonged, you know, much longer than we expected it to be, then more families were willing to engage in this process. So we tried to just offer multiple options so that if it was a technology issue, there were like several different video options for families based on what they have accessible. And as a last resort, if we can’t get any video conferencing going or for some reason our families really don’t feel comfortable with that than we are actually able to do telephone.

 

OXFORD RECOVERY CENTER BREAKS GROUND ON STATE-OF-THE-ART AUTISM CENTER- Casey Diskin

OXFORD RECOVERY CENTER BREAKS GROUND ON STATE-OF-THE-ART AUTISM CENTER
Oxford Recovery Center (ORC) provides world-renowned autism services at centers in Troy and Brighton. Due to the growing need for autism services in the Brighton, Michigan community, Oxford Recovery Center is breaking ground on a 35,000 square foot expansion of their main campus located at the corner of Whitmore Lake Road and Malby Road.
A groundbreaking ceremony to kick off the project will be held at the new building site directly south of the existing facility on May 17th at 10:00. The public is invited to attend. Brivar Construction will be handling the construction of this major investment in the Brighton community.
ORC moved into the current 32,000 square foot building in 2018. “When we moved to the Brighton campus, we felt we would never fill up the building,” says Dr. Tami Peterson, Founder and CEO at Oxford Recovery Center. In just two years, the demand for services has increased dramatically.
Casey Diskin, Executive Director of Autism Services, credits the synergistic approach to treating autism as the main factor in the center’s amazing growth. “Autism diagnoses are on the rise, but more and more parents of children see the benefits of our approach to treatment,” says Diskin. “We believe autism is a medical condition and treat it as such.” Oxford offers more than traditional Applied Behavior Analysis services. “We offer treatments and therapies designed to help our autism patients reach their potential,” explains Diskin. “We have seen amazing results combining hyperbaric oxygen therapy, neurofeedback, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy.” The center does not stop there. A comprehensive testing and medical consultation program helps to isolate medical problems and provides a means to solve them.
This is nothing new for Oxford Recovery Center. It has been providing these services to patients to treat more than 100 medical conditions since 2008. “Our goal is to help our patients get their lives back after an illness or injury. “No matter what your condition, we probably treat it,” says Peterson. “We have successfully treated everything from autism and stroke to macular degeneration and Lyme disease.”
As part of the expansion is a remodeling of the current facility. “All of our services other than autism will be housed in the current facility,” says Gary Marken, Chief Operations Officer at Oxford Recovery Center. “We have already converted 6,500 Square feet of unused space into areas for Speech and Occupational Therapies and a large multi-purpose room for the autism program.” Part of the plan is to expand the company’s hyperbaric oxygen therapy program. “Currently, we operate five hyperbaric oxygen chambers,” continues Marken. “We will be expanding our footprint to include three Chambers.”
Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is the cornerstone of Oxford Recovery Centers success. Using a medical-grade, hard chamber, Oxford is able to deliver 100% oxygen under pressure. Our bodies use oxygen to heal and regenerate themselves, and nothing provides the body with more healing oxygen than HBOT. The treatment is powerful because it floods the body with so much oxygen causing it to concentrate in plasma. This allows the oxygen to reach areas red blood cells cannot and it penetrates deeper into damaged tissues. “Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has many medical benefits including destroying harmful bacteria, encouraging blood vessel growth, fighting viruses, and healing wounds to name a few,” says Peterson “Perhaps the biggest benefit and why it is so effective in treating so many conditions is its ability to reduce inflammation. The concentrated levels of oxygen stimulate intracellular signaling proteins, which upregulate genetic expression of anti-inflammatory molecules.”
Casey Diskin

Casey Diskin in her New Role

Casey Diskin has dedicated over twelve yearls to helping individuals with autism lead healthy, productive lives. While completing her education at Macquarie University, Sydney, Casey Diskin worked at the Learning Center in Sydney, Australia.

Casey Diskin earned her Master’s Degree in psychology. She has worked with a many children with autism and developmental disabilities in numerous capacities for several years. Casey Diskin has experience in verbal behavior programming, skill acquisition, precision teaching, direct instruction and behavior reduction. Casey Diskin spent her first 5 years in practice in Australia before moving back to the US.

In 2018, Casey Diskin joined ORC as their Director of ABA. In 2019 she began her new role as Executive Director of Autism Services. Diskin oversees all Occupational therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech and ABA. Today, ORC has 3 locations throughout the United States and employs nearly 100 highly-skilled employees, and is a leading employer of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs).

Casey Diskin Introduces Camp ABA

Casey Diskin and her team  are always trying to find new, innovative ways to make therapy more exciting for our ARTS Autism clients. Our newest program at Camp ABA reintroduces ABA therapy in a way that’s exciting and full of new activities like shelter building, camp craft, scavenger hunts, and more. “ABA doesn’t have to be sterile”  says ARTS director  Casey Diskin and we want our clients to experience the communities around them.

Coming this fall, Camp ABA will turn into a supplement or alternative option for traditional learning. Casey Diskin and her team  realized that families may be looking for new and different ways for children with autism or special needs to learn outside of public schooling . . .

Casey Diskin runs a new program for children with autism

Since completing her education, Casey Diskin has gone on to help children with disabilities to learn and grow through specialized teachings and outstanding leadership. Along the way, she worked at a number of facilities geared towards helping children improve behavior, including serving as a behavior therapist for the Friendship Circle in West Bloomfield. 

HUNTINGTON WOODS, MI / ACCESSWIRE / November 14, 2019 / For years, Casey Diskin has implemented specialized teachings to assist children with disabilities, especially working with those with autism to promote personal growth. Her distinguished work has led her to take on a number of roles in child development, including the Learning Center in Sydney Australia and Friendship Circle in Metro Detroit.

Casey Diskin began developing tactics and programs to improve the lives of children with disabilities during school, focusing especially on children with autism after graduating from Wayne State University in 2004. She also attended Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, where she pursued a master’s program that helped build up a career helping children from all over the world. Her work seeks to teach lasting lessons and techniques that not only help educate children with autism, but also improves their overall life experiences.

She has been praised for her landmark contributions and unique approach to care and learning for special needs kids, which has laid the foundation for a promising and quickly-growing career. She attributes the details of her unique approach to her program at Macquarie University, which taught her to implement a focus on functional life skills through naturalistic teaching. She returned to America in 2013 and helped launch numerous education programs that are centered around autism recovery.

During her career, Casey Diskin worked as a behavior therapist for the Friendship Circle in West Bloomfield Michigan, which is a non-profit organization affiliated with Lubavitch of Michigan. The goal of the Friendship Circle is “to provide every individual with special needs the support friendship and inclusion that they deserve.” They accomplish this by providing support and assistance to thousands of special needs children and their families. In their work, the Friendship Circle implement recreational, social, educational and vocational programming to provide a well-rounded approach to care and development.

Friendship Circle also provides support to individuals and families struggling with isolation, addiction and other family-related crises. Additionally, the Friendship Circle enriches its vast network of volunteers by allowing them to reap the rewards of selfless giving. The non-profit was founded 25 years ago and has assembled thousands of dedicated supporters across its history, with more people getting involved each year.

As a behavior therapist for the Friendship Circle, Casey Diskin used therapies to observe learned behaviors and how each child’s environment influences these behaviors. From this, she was able to create an individualized plan for mental improvement for each child. Today, her vast experience and knowledge of behavior therapy help her determine practical solutions for countless children with special needs and their families that result in true growth for everyone.

Casey Diskin Brings a Unique Perspective to Autism Care

Casey Diskin has implemented specialized teachings to assist children with disabilities, especially working with those with autism to promote personal growth. Her distinguished work has led her to take on a number of roles in child development, including the Learning Center in Sydney Australia and Friendship Circle in Metro Detroit.

Casey Diskin began developing tactics and programs to improve the lives of children with disabilities during school, focusing especially on children with autism after graduating from Wayne State University in 2004. She also attended Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, where she pursued a master’s program that helped build up a career helping children from all over the world. Her work seeks to teach lasting lessons and techniques that not only help educate children with autism, but also improves their overall life experiences.

She has been praised for her landmark contributions and unique approach to care and learning for special needs kids, which has laid the foundation for a promising and quickly-growing career. She attributes the details of her unique approach to her program at Macquarie University, which taught her to implement a focus on functional life skills through naturalistic teaching. She returned to America in 2013 and helped launch numerous education programs that are centered around autism recovery.

During her career, Casey Diskin worked as a behavior therapist for the Friendship Circle in West Bloomfield Michigan, which is a non-profit organization affiliated with Lubavitch of Michigan. The goal of the Friendship Circle is “to provide every individual with special needs the support friendship and inclusion that they deserve.” They accomplish this by providing support and assistance to thousands of special needs children and their families. In their work, the Friendship Circle implement recreational, social, educational and vocational programming to provide a well-rounded approach to care and development.

Friendship Circle also provides support to individuals and families struggling with isolation, addiction and other family-related crises. Additionally, the Friendship Circle enriches its vast network of volunteers by allowing them to reap the rewards of selfless giving. The non-profit was founded 25 years ago and has assembled thousands of dedicated supporters across its history, with more people getting involved each year.

As a behavior therapist for the Friendship Circle, Casey Diskin used therapies to observe learned behaviors and how each child’s environment influences these behaviors. From this, she was able to create an individualized plan for mental improvement for each child. Today, her vast experience and knowledge of behavior therapy help her determine practical solutions for countless children with special needs and their families that result in true growth for everyone.

Casey Diskin Encourages Novel Therapies for Children with Autism

Casey Diskin serves as a director at a Michigan-based recovery center where big things are happening to improve the lives of children with disabilities.  Casey Diskin has developed a unique approach to care that is gaining increased attention in the medical field as she helps not only the children, but their whole families. Diskin currently oversees an autism recovery program where she uses HBOT (hyperbaric oxygen therapy) combined with speech and occupational therapy, and applied behavior analysis to treat her patients. Her results have been very impressive and considered a huge success.

 

“Once patients with neurological conditions began seeing the great results Casey Diskin could accomplish through hyperbaric oxygen therapy, parents with children on the autism spectrum began asking her to perform the same therapy for their kids.”

 

Diskin claims that she hears stories constantly of happier parents and children as a result of treatment. To name a few of the successes, parents are reporting that their children have built new friendships and are also preforming better in school. “Medically, there is evidence that individuals with autism have inflammation in the brain,” says Casey Diskin. “HBOT medically addresses the issue by reducing the inflammation. Our novel program is a multi-therapy approach to treating autism. We believe in creating a synergistic approach that allows us to treat the medical issues of our clients while simultaneously teaching functional socially significant life skills.”

 

 

Casey Diskin Encourages Novel Therapies for Children with Disabilities

Casey Diskin

Casey Diskin Encourages Novel Therapies for Children with Disabilities

After earning degrees from both Wayne State University and Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, Casey Diskin has worked tirelessly on new solutions for children with disabilities and their families; she’s gained a lot of recognition for her novel approaches and therapies, which include behavior therapy that focuses on socially significant skills

Casey Diskin has proven her dedication to improving the lives of children with disabilities and their families, having created many resources for each during her career. She employs a variety of state-of-the-art therapies that help children grow and hosts several group therapy sessions that build camaraderie among families in her community.

She has developed a truly unique, multi-faceted approach to care that has gained a lot of attention in the medical field for its impactful results. Through her therapies, she helps children with disabilities, especially those suffering from autism, gradually grow beyond their circumstances and improve behavior and cognition.

Today, she serves in a director’s position at a Michigan-based recovery center where she oversees an autism recovery program utilizing applied behavior analysis, speech therapy, occupational therapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy, a recent breakthrough for the condition.

“Our unique approach to autism has been a huge success with families across the state,” says Casey Diskin. “We hear stories all the time of happier parents, children who have developed

new friendships, siblings playing together more, children performing better in school, and more successfully integrating into their communities.”

Casey Diskin lends much of her success to her focus on functional life skills through naturalistic teaching. She attributes this approach to therapy to the training she received while studying at Macquarie University. In addition, she is one of the pioneers of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to treat conditions like autism.

“When I started, I wasn’t even sure I knew what hyperbaric oxygen therapy was. Now I see it and how it works to help children with autism,” says Casey Diskin. “Our team is pretty amazing.

While recovery looks different for every client, it does mean that everyone is improving in their individual skills, health, and quality of life. This is what our synergy program does for its clients

and their families. I want us to do even more for a bigger population. We see so many older kids and young adults come to us. They need our services too,” she concluded.

Once patients with neurological conditions began seeing the great results Casey Diskin could accomplish through hyperbaric oxygen therapy, parents with children on the autism spectrum

began asking her to perform the same therapy for their kids.

“Medically, there is evidence that individuals with autism have inflammation in the brain,” says Casey Diskin. “HBOT medically addresses the issue by reducing the inflammation. Our novel program is a multi-therapy approach to treating autism. We believe in creating a synergistic approach that allows us to treat the medical issues of our clients while simultaneously teaching functional socially significant life skills.”

Casey Diskin

Director Casey Diskin Oversees Novel Autism Program Utilizing a Combination of Breakthrough Therapies

Casey Diskin is dedicated to helping children with disabilities overcome obstacles while improving their individual conditions through a variety of state-of-the-art therapies. She was recently named Director of an autism recovery program based out of Michigan that relies on a unique, multi-faceted approach to care. Her work and her program have gained a lot of attention in the medical field for their impactful results and use of hyperbaric and other novel therapies. 

 

For years, Casey Diskin has pursued a professional career focused on children with disabilities––and especially those with autism––to help them grow on a personal level and find success in individualized learning. Her unique approach to care has allowed her to take on a director’s position where she oversees an autism recovery program utilizing a variety of breakthrough therapies.  

 

“Our unique approach to autism has been a huge success with families across the state,” says

Casey Diskin. “We hear stories all the time of happier parents, children who have developed

new friendships, siblings playing together more, children performing better in school, and more

successfully integrating into their communities.”

 

Casey Diskin is able to achieve outstanding results in the children she works with by focusing on functional life skills through naturalistic teaching. She attributes this useful approach to the training she received while studying at Macquarie University. 

 

“When she joined our team two years ago, we could tell like us, she had a different vision for children; one that saw them overcoming their challenges and becoming more involved in their communities,” said a representative from the facility hosting her recovery program. “We knew she was the perfect fit for the team. Joined with her colleagues, the team worked together child by child to develop a program that would impact them most.”

 

Her peers refer to Casey Diskin as a natural leader and a visionary whose dedication to her clients have a real change in their and their families’ lives. In a short amount of time, she’s helped develop unique processes at her facility that ensure each child receives individualized and tailored services that achieve the best possible outcomes. 

 

“When I started, I wasn’t even sure I knew what Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy was.  Now I see it

and how it works to help children with autism,” says Casey Diskin. “Our team is pretty amazing.  While recovery looks different for every client, it does mean that everyone is improving in their individual skills, health, and quality of life.  This is what our synergy program does for its clients and their families. I want us to do even more for a bigger population. We see so many older kids and young adults come to us.  They need our services too,” she concluded. 

 

Casey Diskin

Casey Diskin Was Named one of “Jewish News” and “The Well’s” 36 Under 36

Casey Diskin has spent her entire career working with kids with disabilities and has made a significant impact on the lives of children and families across the country. To honor her contributions, she was named one of “Jewish News” and “the Well’s” 36 Under 36, a title given to exceptional Jewish contributors under the age of 36. 

 

Each year, The Detroit Jewish News partners with The Well to highlight 36 young professionals who have had a tremendous impact on both Jewish and general communities. Last year, they named Casey Diskin to the list for her work in the community and especially her work with kids with disabilities. The people who appear on the list are described as go-getters, doers, entrepreneurs, philanthropists, activists, and community organizers who are nominated through the program each year. 

 

The 36 Under 36 is a project organized by The Well, which is an inclusive Jewish community building, education and spirituality outreach initiative geared to the needs of millennials and the unaffiliated or under-affiliated in the Metro Detroit area. The belief of The Well is that Jewish ethics, values and spirituality can and should be directly applicable to our lives as part of a radically inclusive Jewish community. In addition, they believe these elements should drive us to positively impact both intimate communities and the world at large.

 

They achieve this vision by supporting young professionals like Casey Diskin and increasing the number of people actively participating in community-centric Jewish living in Metro Detroit. The Well accomplishes this by means of relationship building, network weaving and participant-driven programming. As a whole, The Well is a project of the Lori Talsky Zekelman Fund at Temple Israel.

 

Through their 36 under 36 listing, the group is able to highlight the achievements of young Jewish professionals and spread the positive work they do in communities across Chicago and the surrounding area. At the same time, the list inspires others to get involved in their communities, both general and Jewish. The Well was founded in 2015 and the 36 Under 36 was created just a couple of years later. 

 

Casey Diskin has worked with children with autism and other developmental disorders since earning her degree in 2004. She completed her undergraduate program at Wayne State University and earned a master’s degree from Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia before completing an internship through Melbourne University that provided real-world experience to support her education. 

 

Today, Casey Diskin collaborates with  Behavior analysts (BCBAs), Speech therapists and occupational therapists to provide support to families with children that present challenging behaviors.